Medical Aid Arrives in Central African Republic

“...this aid is already helping to restore health services to people in need. ”

Karl Erdmann, AmeriCares emergency response manager.

As continued political instability and lawlessness worsen the humanitarian crisis in post-coupe Central African Republic, an emergency shipment of urgently-needed medical kits arrived in mid-July, with enough medicines and medical supplies to help partners deliver primary care to roughly 10,000 people for 3 months.

An estimated 225,000 people have fled the violence and political instability and are internally displaced. The civil conflict has affected the entire country of 4.6 million, severely disrupting health care services with basic medicines in dangerously short supply. The emergency medical kits include antibiotics and other medicines and medical supplies to help restock clinics and hospitals looted during the violence.

Conflict, Hunger, Poverty

200,000

internally displaced


55,000

fled to neighboring countries


Widespread disruption

in basic health services

“As a result of the crisis, most health clinics have been closed for months, and many health posts have been looted, leaving tens of thousands of people without access to even the most basic medical care,” explained Karl Erdmann, emergency response manager at AmeriCares. “This aid is already helping to restore health services to people in need.”

Our partner is working with local hospitals and clinics to distribute the medical aid where it is needed most. In the meantime, our emergency response team is working with partners to keep abreast of other critical needs in the country.

AmeriCares has a long history of delivering aid to help people affected by civil conflict. Our large-scale response continues to help refugees fleeing the brutal violence in Syria.  In 2012, AmeriCares launched a multi-country response to reduce the profound human suffering in the Sahel region of West Africa, where hundreds of thousands remain displaced by conflict and a lingering hunger crisis.