Lebanon

A Refugee Family’s Journey to Health

  • June 18, 2017
  • Photo E3 Partners Ministry
  • Emergency Programs, Newsroom

The winter journey from Syria was rough for this family of four: By the time they reached Lebanon, the children were severely malnourished and ill. The anxious parents had no idea where to find health care in their new country.

A volunteer medical team supported by Americares was set up in Lebanon to provide free health services to Syrian refugees, and the young family found the care they needed.

Syrian family fleeing violence finds the health care they need

“All of the patients we served were refugees with little access to health care, Many of the refugees are unemployed or make very little money.” 

Trishana Ducros, registered nurse and team leader

Medical Outreach Teams

Ducros’s group, from E3 Partners Ministry, was one of 63 teams using critical medicine and supplies donated by Americares to provide health care to refugee communities in Greece, Jordan, Lebanon and Turkey. Since the crisis began six years ago, Americares has provided teams with enough medicine to fill 90,000 prescriptions. “The donated medications were an invaluable tool to restore many to health and hope,” says Ducros.

History of Help

In this war torn country, Americares provides Syrians with medicine, mobile medical teams and support for hospitals.

The organization is also training health professionals working in Jordan, Syria and Turkey to develop mental health skills and strategies critical where homes, businesses, hospitals and clinics are targets of bombings and other attacks.  The skills will benefit health workers and patients.  In Jordan, Americares is also addressing chronic disease among refugees and host communities.  Read more about our work in Syria.

“Americares is dedicated to meeting the health needs of Syrians – whether they’ve been forced to flee or remain in their home country. We will continue to work with our local partners to address the unique health challenges of this violent and long-running crisis.”

Garrett Ingoglia, Vice President of Emergency Response